It’s Not About The Pain

Being a good osteopath involves being good at communication.

Being good at communication involves being good at listening.

Being good at listening involves understanding, not only what was said, but what wasn’t said.

This is because:

People don’t seek your help because of their pain, they seek your help because of the pain their pain causes.

When We Start, We Don’t Know Where We Will End Up

When I was a teenager, I was lucky enough that my dad, for whatever reason, bought a copy of a book called Smart Sport, which is essentially a book of sports science for lay people.

I read that book multiple times, developing an interest in exercise physiology and sports performance.

Indirectly, that has lead me into my current profession, but that is not what this post is about.

Because of my interest in exercise physiology, I became interested in cycling, and if you were interested in cycling at the turn of the century, you were interested in Lance Armstrong. Say what you want about him, but the man made cycling exciting!

Part of his appeal was his back story, which he detailed in a book titled It’s Not About The Bike.

The book outlines Lance’s struggles in life, and with cancer, as well as his comeback from the brink of death. It peaks when Lance is on the recovery trail and is climbing a hill in Colorado, when he realises his life is meant to be a struggle.

Which brings me to pain.

Pain Is Good, And Bad

None of us is entitled to be pain free, all the time.

[Note: This actually wouldn’t be a good thing either, as people with congenital analgesia (genetically can’t feel pain) tend to have shorter lifespans than average.]

Most of us are lucky in that we only experience pain in a positive way. That is, short term pain that is protecting us from something obvious (or not so obvious); a broken bone, a strained muscle, too much exertion in too little time.

However, some people experience constant, chronic pain, which we could say is not positive at all, but rather negative.

This pain is still protective (all pain is), however it is also pathological.

It occurs when the nervous system has changed, both in structure and function and become hyper protective. This type of pain is negative, because in the vast majority of cases it doesn’t correlate well with any tissue damage needing protection, and becomes a big hurdle to living a full life.

What we (as a population) have to understand is, some pain cannot be resolved.

We just don’t know enough yet. And even if we did, perhaps some pain is not meant to be resolved?

So if you are suffering from chronic pain, you have to ask yourself:

If this pain never went away, can I still live a good life?

And to me, as an osteopath, the answer is always yes. Mind you, many people will actually experience their pain decreases as they learn how to manage it better, but more on that later.

If you have have chronic pain, and you cannot fathom a way to live a good life, then you need help.

You need a team of health professionals who understand pain, who can work with you on reshaping your expectations, improving your management and helping you get as much out of life as possible.

#TheStruggleIsReal

Back to Lance. This is what I think he was talking about: life is all about the struggle.

We all struggle.

Our struggles vary, but to the person struggling, as the internet says “the struggle is real”.

But this struggle defines us.

It is because we struggle that we become stronger people.

It is because we struggle that we rely on others, building relationships that add to the richness of life.

It is because we struggle that we can help others who share the same struggle.

Perhaps, if we can learn to find meaning in the struggle, the struggle isn’t so much of a struggle, but a journey. And like every journey, some have it harder than others. Some don’t even make it. It’s not fair, but it is life.

Knowledge Is Power

I have talked about pain over the last few years, using tens of thousands of words to try and help people understand what pain is, how it works and how to move, think and live in order to overcome pain and achieve optimal health.

But overcoming pain doesn’t always mean getting rid of pain.

It means overcoming the adversity that pain brings.

It means understanding the key points of pain science education, as my friend and colleague Alison Sim outlines:

  • Pain does not equal tissue damage
  • Focus on function, not pain
  • Use physiology to underpin management (i.e. manipulate physiology with exercise and pyschological techniques to reduce stress and anxiety)

Mostly, it means understanding that it’s not about the pain, it’s about living as well as possible given the circumstances.

Nick Efthimiou Osteopath

 

This blog post was written by Dr Nick Efthimiou (Osteopath), founder of Integrative Osteopathy.

This blog post is meant as an educational tool only. It is not a replacement for medical advice from a qualified and registered health professional.